Two women talking

Circles of two

As humans, we are happier and healthier when we have someone to talk to when we need it.

If you’re newly diagnosed, at a turning point, or simply need to connect, ask for a circle of two. We’ll listen, help you in whatever way we can, or assist you in finding additional community resources. We can offer an attentive ear to whatever your day’s concern is—whether physical, emotional, mental, or spiritual.

There are three ways to connect:

  • Simply drop by Monday through Friday from 10 am to 2 pm.
  • Talk to someone by phone by calling us at 360.221.4101 Monday through Friday from 10 am to 2 pm.
  • Call and leave voicemail or send email via this website and leave your name and phone number. A volunteer will get back to you.
  • Our volunteers are trained in peer-to-peer co-counseling methods such as active listening and clear reflection. Circle hosts do not offer medical or other advice or therapy.The same circle agreements apply in circles of two: confidentiality; listening with compassion and curiosity; honoring each others’ respective paths; and pausing for a moment whenever necessary to catch our breath and bearings.
Two women and one man smiling

Coming Together circles

Coming Together circles meet our deep need for human connection. Although some circles are organized around a specific topic or life circumstance, Coming Together circles are organized around our shared humanity. Topics arise organically based on what group members are experiencing at the time.

How would you like to come together? Please let us know.

Our current circles include:

Men’s Circle

2nd and 4th Mondays, 7-8:30

To join waitlist, email info@healingcircleslangley.org.

BIPOC Grannies

1st Sunday

To join waitlist, email info@healingcircleslangley.org.

The healing power of social support

We know anecdotally that feeling more connected, less isolated, and having an increased sense of well-being is important to our health, and there is significant research that supports this. People with stronger social relationships have a 50 percent increased likelihood of survival.